Animals as elements: 55-56 Cesium Brown Bear, Barium Barramundi

Cesium is a highly reactive alkali metal. It’s high toxicity generally means its use is limited to atomic clocks and as a drilling lubricant (as a liquid alloy). It will react with water at even very low temperatures, which means care has to be taken in its use.

Brown Bears are large omnivorous mammals. They are capable of putting on a huge amount of weight to hibernate through winter months, eating almost anything. Encroachment of human habitation has led to more encounters with the creatures in the search of enough calories to last the winter. They can easily kill a man, if so inclined. Their hunger and danger makes them a good match for cesium.

Barium is a highly reactive element that is in general not found in nature. It’s mostly used for processing esters, x Ray contrast and making endothermic reactions. It’s actually often forms insoluble salts that don’t react with water, which makes pairing it with water creatures a little unusual. I couldn’t though go past the silly pun, so.

Barramundi also known as Asian sea bass and Australian sea bass. It’s a very highly sought after fish for fishing and as food. Though it is flakey and often has low flavor it’s often cooked with various flavors such as lime and garlic, and is a favorite fish for curry. It’s a undergoes sequential gender variation, changing gender often after one or two seasons as a adult male to adult female.

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Animals as Elements: 45-46 Rhodium Beewolf & Palladium Horse

Rhodium is a rare earth metal that is often used to keep various other more volatile silver colored metals from corrosion. It also plays a part in catalytic converters in cars and other petroleum based engineers. It’s also used to measure Neutron Flux in nuclear power plants.

The Beewolf is a wasp species that specifically feeds or lays it’s eggs specifically in bees. It’s hunting is not very much like the wolf, mostly being a solitary wasp. It’s similarity to rhodium is mostly in this behaviour to be a loner, rhodium doesn’t really react and is very none corrosive.

Palladium is similar in its use in catalytic converters. It’s also a metal with heavy investment stock and interest in capture by recycling. It is the first part of a car to be recycled due to its rarity.

The Horse is another animal that attracts heavy investment an attention. Almost completely domesticated, the horse is now bred to race but it used to be humman’s main beast of burden. Though often bred selectivity for multiple purposes. Like Palladium they are a considerable resource that we may not treat in the most humane way at times.

Animals as Elements: 31-32, Gallium Dodo, Germanium Boar

The Dodo is famous for being the bird that became extinct. Gallium does not occur as a free element (only as an alloy, usually with zinc or aluminium in bauxite) and is a reasonably soft pliable metal. It’s used in most consumer electronics in semiconductors. Why do they belong together? Gallium is also used to keep the crystal structure of plutonium stable. Plutonium has limited uses, expect in nuclear medicine and thermonuclear bombs. Without gallium, we wouldn’t be able to keep thermonuclear weapons stable. Also, we would likely be less close to mutually assured destruction.

Germanium is a hungry element much like oxygen or carbon; it forms binds to a high number of other elements. Thus a boar is a good match for this element.

Animals as Elements: 15-16 Phosphorus Firefly & Sulfer Crested Cockatoo

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Phosphorus is an element that is very reactive. When it was first discovered, with the purification of urine, the green, yellow glow given in a low light gave it the name it now holds. Phosphorescence now also hold this name too, even though the light produced by phosphorus belongs to the broader chemiluminescence. Though truly fireflies produce their light using a luciferin chemical which contains no phosphorus at all. Some luciferin chemicals do though. Fireflies were, however, the ones to give fame to Bioluminescence and Phosphorescence and the study of producing light without flame or electricity.

Sulfer Crested Cockatoos are another Australian animal. It is also the first animal in the series to have an elemental name in its common name. The yellow crest though just looks like crystallized Sulfer, though this was how the common name for the cockatoo came about. It pretty much reacts with most elements, and though the cockatoos are not as harsh, they have been the bane of farmers, eating grain sowed in soil or from crops. They make what is regarded as the worst calls in the bird kingdom. Thus the element is a good name for them. Despite this, they are a fairly intelligent and like budgerigars have made it into homes as a pet.

Animals as Elements: 9&10 Fluorine Cane Toad and Neon Budgerigar


Fluoride as a Cane Toad is pretty much the best comparison I can make as an Australian. Fluoride is highly toxic halogen, and almost everything reacts with it. Cane Toads (also known as Marine Toad or the giant neotropical toad have become a highly invasive species in Australia. Mostly introduced to get rid of another introduced pest (Irony if the highest order) the Cane Toads made a quick beeline to eat as much as they could wherever they went. Being coated in a highly toxic mucus, the predators quickly learned to stick clear, though some have learned to flip the bodies over and attack their belly. Fluorides toxic nature and its ability to become attached to

Neon is the first “noble gas” if you don’t count Helium (which some don’t). Budgerigars are another Australian connection through this time a native. Budgerigars are recently domesticated birds, and usually, live in flocks in outback Australia. Though they are threatened by foxes and cats, who were introduced by the settlers early on in settlement.

Budgerigars usually have a bright array of feathers on the male. A lot of dimorphism in nature sees the male of the species be the “prettier” more colorful one. The dimorphism is often to show the health of the male. The heavier, the more bright and nice looking his coat. Neon is often used in colorful lights by humans, along with other noble gases and colored glass or additives to make them shine a particular color and brightness. This is how for me Budgerigahs fit in with Neon.