Animals as Elements: 9&10 Fluorine Cane Toad and Neon Budgerigar


Fluoride as a Cane Toad is pretty much the best comparison I can make as an Australian. Fluoride is highly toxic halogen, and almost everything reacts with it. Cane Toads (also known as Marine Toad or the giant neotropical toad have become a highly invasive species in Australia. Mostly introduced to get rid of another introduced pest (Irony if the highest order) the Cane Toads made a quick beeline to eat as much as they could wherever they went. Being coated in a highly toxic mucus, the predators quickly learned to stick clear, though some have learned to flip the bodies over and attack their belly. Fluorides toxic nature and its ability to become attached to

Neon is the first “noble gas” if you don’t count Helium (which some don’t). Budgerigars are another Australian connection through this time a native. Budgerigars are recently domesticated birds, and usually, live in flocks in outback Australia. Though they are threatened by foxes and cats, who were introduced by the settlers early on in settlement.

Budgerigars usually have a bright array of feathers on the male. A lot of dimorphism in nature sees the male of the species be the “prettier” more colorful one. The dimorphism is often to show the health of the male. The heavier, the more bright and nice looking his coat. Neon is often used in colorful lights by humans, along with other noble gases and colored glass or additives to make them shine a particular color and brightness. This is how for me Budgerigahs fit in with Neon.

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